jump to navigation

Scientific American – Health Articles February 6, 2008

Posted by indianalternativemedicine in Articles, Reports, Research, Scientific American, Syndicate:News.
trackback

News: How Our Genomes Control DiversityTwo recent discoveries have shed new light on the source of diversity in the human population. In one study, scientists examined patterns in DNA recombination, the process by which a person’s genome is consolidated into one set of chromosomes to pass onto…
News: Ahchoo! Mice Bred to Catch Common ColdIf you’re suffering through a cold as you read this, with all the mucus, throbbing of temples and listlessness that come with it, let a new study cheer you up: Researchers have created the first mice susceptible to the one of the most common human cold…
News: Are Americans Afraid of the Outdoors?Americans have been visiting national parks and other natural reserves less and less since 1987, new research confirms. Outdoor pursuits, ranging from camping to hunting, have entered a persistent and growing decline.

Sciam Observations Blog: The science of Superbowl fandom: why your testosterone level is upAre you a Giants fan? Are you feeling good today? It could be the testosterone boost you got from vicariously participating in the Giants’ miraculous late-game win in Sunday’s Super Bowl.This effect has been known about for quite some time — a 1998 paper…
News: Net Benefits: Bed Netting, Drugs Stem Malaria DeathsFour African countries saw significantly fewer childhood deaths from malaria after distributing insecticide-treated bed nets and combination drug therapy, according to a new report released by the World Health Organization (WHO).

News: News Bytes of the Week–Mystery Illness Strikes BatsFor bats in peril, white noses nothing to sniff at

News: Is Old Age Memory Decline Reversible?Scientists have found that a lessened supply of new nerve cells in the adult brain apparently triggers short-term memory loss typically associated with aging, setting the stage for one day developing therapies designed to maintain a steady supply of fresh…
News: Pigs Could Be the Salvation of Diabetes SufferersMost people probably view pigs at best as a source of sustenance or, at worst, as filthy, gluttonous animals. But it seems our porcine pals may also prove invaluable in the fight against type 1 diabetes. Researchers are experimenting with new ways of…
Scientific American Mind: C’mere, Big BoyMost female mammals go into some form of estrus, or heat, when fertile, displaying hormone-induced behavioral changes that mark ovulation. Scientists used to think that humans were the exception, but evidence is mounting that women may undergo their own,…
Scientific American Mind: Heart Attack PanicAt their peak, panic attack symptoms are so severe and frightening that people often mistake them for signs of a heart attack and rush to the hospital.

Scientific American Mind: Mental Illness in AmericaIn any given year 26 percent of American adults suffer from mental disorders, based on guidelines in the official handbook for diagnosing mental illness, the DSM-IV.

Scientific American Mind: Uncovering “Brainscams”Most of us take our brain for granted. As poet Robert Frost wrote, “The brain is a wonderful organ. It starts working the moment you get up in the morning and does not stop until you get into the office.” Weighing in at a mere three pounds and…
Scientific American Mind: Sex is Better for Women in LoveWomen certainly know when they experience one, but science, on the other hand, knows surprisingly little about the female orgasm. Most studies have looked at animals rather than humans, focusing on how sensory information flows to and from the sex organs….
Scientific American Mind: The Sound of SilenceFrom the moment we begin to hear, our auditory system is precisely tuned, able to distinguish subtle differences between sounds. But how does it get that way? New research reveals how developing ears generate their own noise, a process that may help…
Scientific American Mind: Predicting Alzheimer’sDiagnosing Alzheimer’s disease is difficult–confirmation can be obtained only postmortem, by verifying at autopsy that the brain has an abundant amount of plaque made up of the sticky beta-amyloid protein. To gauge Alzheimer’s in living…
Scientific American Mind: Stem Cells for MemoryStem cells have long been heralded as a potential treatment for a range of brain ailments, but research has so far focused on movement disorders such as Parkinson’s disease. Now a new animal study shows that the immature cells could also help with…
Scientific American Mind: “Chemo Brain” CulpritThose who have endured the rigors of cancer therapy talk about “chemo brain,” the memory and concentration problems that accompany radiation and chemotherapy. Now researchers led by neurologist Michelle L. Monje of Harvard University have…
Scientific American Mind: The Medicated AmericansI am thinking of the Medicated Americans, those 11 percent of women and 5 percent of men who are taking antidepressants.

Scientific American Mind: The Character CodeYou are diagnosed with a crippling illness. You lose your job. Someone close to you suddenly dies. Some people recover rapidly from life’s calamities and disappointments, whereas others are devastated by minor setbacks, becoming depressed and even…
Scientific American Mind: Misery in MotherhoodThe psychologist smiles at Manuela, a new mother in her late thirties. “Please play with your baby for two minutes,” the therapist instructs her and then leaves the room. Two video cameras film Manuela (which is not her real name) and her…

Comments»

No comments yet — be the first.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: